Developing Your Drawing Skills
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Developing Your Drawing Skills

Knowing how to draw can either be inborn or learned. Or, it can be both talent and skill. Drawing is basically an eye-hand-mind coordination. Thus, those who are endowed with this gift of coordination find drawing an easy and enjoyable form of self expression.
              developing drawing skills

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Knowing how to draw can either be inborn or learned. Or, it can be both talent and skill. Drawing is basically an eye-hand-mind coordination. Thus, those who are endowed with this gift of coordination find drawing an easy and enjoyable form of self expression.

Though some can easily draw from memory, others do well with a model or subject. This is called drawing from observation.

However, with the right attitude and discipline, anyone can learn how to draw.

If you draw from observation, below are some tips to help improve your drawing skills:

Observe your subject. Before you start a single stroke, examine your subject critically - shapes, forms, angles, and proportions between objects. If you are drawing a face, make a sketch of its basic shapes - round, oblong, or square. Take note of its angle and proportions.

Have a practical rather than critical assessment while you draw. Critical assessments might go this way:

  • I never draw the eyes right. The lips look awkward. I am not good at this.

Here are practical assessments on the other hand:

  • What is the shape of the eyes? It's more of an almond shape and the upper eyelid is droopy. The distance between eyes looks equal to the size of an eye.

These practical assessments stimulate your eye-hand-mind coordination.

Focus on the subject. You will draw better if you focus on your subject than on your drawing. If you focus on your drawing, you tend to see imperfections and criticize your work. If you focus on the subject, however, you see more of its features - shape, angle, and proportion. This will help your hand capture and render on paper what your eyes see - pointing you back to the eye-hand-mind coordination.

Shade according to the contour. Shading gives depth and volume to your drawing. It gives a realistic or 3D effect. Before you start, determine where the light and shade fall. Squinting both eyes simplifies tonal values - shadow, mid-tones, and highlights.

It is best to use a soft graphite pencil to shade, ranging from B (light to medium) to 6B (dark), depending on your preference.

To shade a tea cup, start with curving strokes conforming to the round contour of the cup. By doing so, you will make it look more round. You may dab a kneaded eraser to make highlights or to tone down over-shaped area.

Now, with these pointers, you may try your hand at drawing. Remember that one of the keys to success is attitude. And practice, of course. It does make perfect.

                drawing skills

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Materials:

  • Sketch pad
  • Graphite pencil (2B, 4B)
  • Kneaded eraser
  • Model or subject (optional)

     

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Comments (4)

Freehand drawing has never been one of my fortes. Mechanical drawing was my thing, even back in the day when we had to use a drawing board, T-Square and instruments. Today I use CAD programs and Google Sketch-Up. Wonderful article.

I used to draw before I learned to write. I learned calligraphy when I was 10 but all those were out of practice now. I would like to get a try at CAD programs as Jerry did. An excellent encouragement for everyone to try drawing.

This reminds me of my former inclination.

I made some sketches too...thanks for more info.

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